Sharing Resources: The Joint Board of Examining Chaplains

Our collaboration with the Diocese of Western New York isn’t just discussion for the future – the Joint Board of Examining Chaplains is a shared ministry of both dioceses that over the past three years has shown how combining resources can benefit our ongoing work for the Kingdom. Read on to learn more about this ongoing collaboration. 

The Joint Board of Examining Chaplains (JBEC) has for the last 3 years helped the Commissions on Ministry (COMs) of both the Diocese of Western New York and the Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania monitor and assess the academic preparation of postulants and candidates for ordained ministry. The JBEC currently consists of six chaplains, three from each diocese, with one from each diocese serving as co-chairs. They meet twice a year, in the spring and fall, and use their time together to review work submitted from those in the formation process. Reports then go directly to the COMs to help in their work of shepherding our future clergy through their formation.

This shared ministry of the two dioceses is the result of conversations that began early in 2013, when the bishops of each diocese asked their examining chaplains to meet together and discuss the possibility of how we could share resources. Those first meetings explored the logistical issues of working together, the similarities and differences between the formation process and culture of each diocese, and the potential benefits. Very quickly we saw that having a larger team of people committed to the ministry meant better oversight and broader perspectives available for the work, and the potential negatives could be easily mitigated by careful planning and communication.

Time was spent putting together a proposal for how the joint committee would function, along with a set of requests on how we would want to do that work. One key piece has been the development of guidelines for postulants and candidates that ask them to build a portfolio of work from the academic formation, pieces of which get submitted to the JBEC each year. This way, instead of a cursory inspection of work towards the end of the formation process, the JBEC can both suggest ideas for improvement along the way and also have ample evidence of a candidate’s preparation in case end of formation examinations raise concerns.

That proposal went to the two dioceses in the summer of 2014, and at the conventions later that year the current members of the JBEC were appointed. Currently, The Rev. Vicki Zust and The Rev. Matthew Scott serve as the co-chairs.

The Rev. Matthew Scott is vicar of the Episcopal Mission of Warren County – St. Francis and Trinity Memorial churches. 

Blessing of the Animals Around the Diocese

Parts of this story excerpted from the opposingviews website.

St. Francis Youngsville

St. Francis Youngsville

Episcopalians celebrate the Blessing of the Animals where people have the rare opportunity to bring their pets to church to receive special blessings, on a Sunday close to the Feast of St. Francis. This past Sunday was the feast of St. Francis.

St. Francis of Assisi was well known for his love of animals. Stories tell of him preaching to flocks of birds, dissuading mosquitoes from biting him and even convincing a wolf to stop stalking humans and livestock in Gubbio, Italy, where he once lived. At the Blessing of the Animals, people remember and emulate Francis’ example of love for animals and appreciation of God’s creations.

The Episcopal Church has long taken a pro-animal stance, reminding members that animals are gifts from God and that people are responsible for being good stewards of the earth and all its inhabitants. In the 76th General Convention (2009), the Episcopal Church reaffirmed that animals are part of creation and that humans must be responsible stewards over them. The church has gone so far as to speak out against puppy mills, factory farms and any other animal husbandry methods that cause suffering to animals. These positions are not new. Even in 1840, The Rev. Thomas Fuller regretted that humans had exterminated some species and enslaved the rest, writing, “We have treated our distant cousins in fur and feathers so badly that beyond doubt if they were able to formulate a religion, they would depict the devil in human form.”

See pictures below of how some of our churches celebrated.


St. Stephens blessed a garden


Emmanuel, Corry


Mother Mary at Emmanuel, Corry


Rabbits at the Cathedral


Dean Downey blesses a dog

Fr Matthew with stuffed

Fr. Matthew blesses a stuffed animal


Cathedral sheep


Poki the clown